About Acupuncture And Your Treatment

Background
Acupuncture has a clearly recorded history of about 2,000 years, however, some authorities claim that it has been practiced in China for 4,000 years. The Chinese believe that the practice of acupuncture began during the Stone Age when stone knives or sharp edged tools, described by the character 'Bian', were used to puncture and drain abscesses. In fact, the modern Chinese character ‘Bi’ represents a disease of pain. The first recorded attempt at conceptualizing and treating disease was found on tortoise shell inscriptions dating back to about 1500 BC during the Shang dynasty. This ancient system of medicine is expanding in the West. It continues to prove its efficacy by improving health in or modern culture.

The Chinese describe acupuncture by the character 'Chen', which literally means 'to prick with a needle. However, acupuncture, or needle puncture, is a European term invented by Willem Ten Rhyne, a Dutch physician who visited Nagasaki in Japan in the early part of the seventeenth century.

Traditional acupuncture involves inserting sterile, stainless steel, and disposable needles into specific points on the surface of the skin. The needles are the size of a small human hair. This action creates an ionic transfer that sets in motion an elegant interaction of the body’s own energy restoring symmetry to the body, mind, and spirit.

The sophisticated yet subtle method of treatment is so effective because it focuses on each patient’s inherent needs. Chuan Tse, the leading Taoist in the 4th century B.C., proclaimed, “Nature’s differ, and needs with them, Hence, the wise men of old did not lay down one measure for all.”

The Healing System of Acupuncture
Acupuncture is a powerful medicine that aids in strengthening the immune system. Acupuncture helps prevent disease, control pain, and increase the ability to function. By achieving these results, acupuncture improves the quality of life. Acupuncture is a well-developed whole health system based on natural energetic laws.

The World Health Organization of the United Nations identifies over 40 conditions acupuncture successfully treats. Studies are released every month in professional journals from all over the world describing the new uses.

Chinese Approach to Medicine and Science

Philosophy
The first medical textbook on acupuncture was called the Nei Ching Su Wen; this literally means The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine and it dates from about 400 BC. It deals almost exclusively with philosophical concepts that are as important today as they were 2,000 years ago. These ideas are based on a broader worldview.  Its ideas are woven into a complete system based philosophy that is very different than modern Western medicine. Western doctors use current physiological theories to explain how acupuncture works.

The basis of traditional Chinese scientific thought is grounded on the concepts of Yin and Yang, and the number five. Yin and Yang are opposite aspects of the material world. The number five represents the five elements in the physical world (earth, fire, water, wood and metal). These five elements have also been described as the five transitional stages of all physical materials. Together, these concepts describe the fundamental fluctuating balance of nature - analogous to the modern concept of ecology. The metaphoric principle is that all things must be in a fluctuating balance to maintain harmony with oneself and his universe.

How it Works
Acupuncture uses natural laws and energetic principles rooted in Taoism. It is the insertion of very fine needles (about the size of a human hair) into specific points where energy is pooled. This action creates an ionic transfer that sets into motion an interaction of the body’s own energy restoring symmetry to the body, mind, and spirit. It is a sophisticated yet subtle method of treatment that is effective because it focuses on each patient’s inherent needs. The Chinese mapped these points over a period of two thousand years. Traditional acupuncture is based on ancient Chinese theories of the flow of Qi (Energy) and Xue (Blood) through distinct, intricate meridians or pathways that circulate throughout the body.

You are an amazing, complex system. Functions of your body, mind, and spirit reflect the qualities of nature’s elements. Traditional Chinese Medicine is defined as one’s ability to maintain a balanced and harmonious internal environment. When body, mind, and spirit function in harmony, there is health or, wellness.

Anatomy and Physiology
Acupuncture anatomy is a multi-layered, interconnecting network of channels, also called meridians. These channels create an interface between an individual’s internal and external environments. Meridians go directly from the surface-where their energy is pooled at the prescribed site of the acupuncture point to the depth of the organs. When health is balanced, energy flows freely through the meridians. Principal meridians travel through muscles and provide nourishment to tissues and vitality for physical activity. Additionally, meridians transport nourishment and energy, produced by the organs, throughout the body. Skillful insertion of a needle into a specific point sets this cascade in motion.

The noticeable effect of acupuncture is symptom relief, but it is far more than that. Acupuncture treats the root of your problem. With its origin in Taoism, acupuncture harmonizes a person with his source. Those who receive acupuncture often experience new and profound states of peace, clarity and harmony through treatment, which often has a lasting impact.

How effective is Acupuncture?
Acupuncture is highly effective not only as a preventative medicine, but as a drug free treatment of signs and symptoms.

Studies indicate that acupuncture influences the central and peripheral nervous systems. Evidence shows that it releases endorphins from the brain. This phenomenon makes acupuncture particularly effective in pain control. Other studies have shown the efficacy of acupuncture and its effects on sugar, triglyceride, and cholesterol levels in the blood, as well as the functioning of the gastrointestinal system, and the activity of the endocrine system.

In addition, the use of electro acupuncture has proven very successful in the area of infertility. The results are an increase in blood flow in the uterine arteries. Many mainland clinic Infertility clinics are incorporating acupuncture into their IVF treatment protocol with great success.

Can Acupuncture Help Senior Citizens?
Yes. Acupuncture greatly enhances circulation, improves mental clarity, and helps insomnia. It is also very helpful with aiding in the recovery of stroke patients.

Oriental Diagnosis and Examination
On your first visit most acupuncturist will listen carefully to you in an extensive interview, which provides vital clues to an overall pattern of health or disease. The acupuncturist will feel the subtle variations in the pulses in the wrists. The pulses provide valuable information about how the body is functioning and aids in the root cause analysis of the exam. The sound of the voice, the condition of the tongue, smell, overall appearance of the face, skin, complexion-including color and undertones-, and emotions all are important indicators of your condition.

What Can I Expect With Acupuncture?
Most people experience a pleasing depth of relaxation, with an intense synergistic energy, and a calm sense of well being and healing from the rebalance of energy that occurs with treatment. Relief from symptoms can be felt immediately, within days, or, within a few weeks depending on the severity of the illness and how long it has persisted.

Needles
The needles I use in my clinic are sterile, disposable needles. They are used once then discarded.

Modern Scientists Can Detect And Catalogue Human Biofields

Medical science has been using energy concepts to create insights or windows into the body with imagery equipment, from x-rays, CAT scans, EEG, ECG, PET, to the MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imagery) that is able to visualize a tumor inside the body. The MRI stimulates atoms by stimulation of the transfer of energy of a specific frequency. All of these remarkable diagnostic tools provide glimpses into the body at different energetic frequencies — a glimpse into matter at the energy level. The truth is we are both chemical and electrical. Modern scientists can detect and catalogue human biofields using SQUIDS (Superconducting Quantum Interferometric Devices.) SQUIDS are ultra sensitive magnetic fields detectors. These tests show us how we generate AC electromagnetic fields around our nerves and muscles, and DC electromagnetic fields around our brain. When the body’s energy becomes imbalanced, organic problems and disease follows.

A Leap of Faith: Views From a Western Medical Practitioner About Acupuncture

Dr. Sherwin B. Nuland, a clinical professor of surgery at Yale, author, and winner of the National Book Award is a forward thinker and proponent of acupuncture. He states, “Doctors…have to be more than technicians. They should be, first of all, humanists, intuitionists, appreciative of each patient’s individuality and particular situation, practitioners of a quirky, unpredictable, uncertain art. True healers understand this. ‘To become comfortable with uncertainty’,…is one of the primary goals in the training of a physician.”

He traveled to China to determine firsthand if acupuncture is an effective technique. He witnessed two operations and spoke to the president of the Shanghai Medical University, who had undergone two thyroid operations with acupuncture.  Dr. Nuland came away a believer. He stated that, “even though the procedure has still not been explained in terms acceptable to most orthodox Western scientists using orthodox Western investigative methods.”

He goes on to say that, “Science as we know it has gone at least part of the way in understanding acupuncture: somehow the needles stimulate the brain to increase its production of analgesic endorphins. But why that happens is not clear.” Dr. Nuland confesses that, “Perhaps philosophies may be required beyond those that have been so successful since the scientific method became a major current of Western thought.”

See the full article here: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/06/books/06book.html?_r=1

Acupuncture:
An Artful Sage for 4,000 Years in the East,
A Scientific Infant in the West

By: Sheryl Malin, RN, MAcOM, BS, CNOR, LAc

From: Resolve (the national infertility association). Hawaii Chapter 2005-2006. p.p. 79-80 Family Building Manual

The History of Acupuncture in China
Acupuncture has a clearly recorded history of about 2,000 years, but some authorities claim that it has been practiced in China for 4,000 years. The Chinese believe that the practice of acupuncture began during the Stone Age when stone knives or sharp edged tools, described by the character 'Bian', were used to puncture and drain abscesses. In fact, the modern Chinese character 'Bi', represents a disease of pain. The first recorded attempt at conceptualizing and treating disease was found on tortoise shell inscriptions dating back to about 1500 BC during the Shang dynasty.

The Chinese describe acupuncture by the character 'Chen', which literally means 'to prick with a needle. However, acupuncture, or needle puncture, is a European term invented by Willem Ten Rhyne, a Dutch physician who visited Nagasaki in Japan in the early part of the seventeenth century.

Chinese Approach to Medicine and Science

Philosophy

The first medical textbook on acupuncture was called the Nei Ching Su Wen; this literally means The Yellow Emperor’s Classic of Internal Medicine and it dates from about 400 BC. It deals almost exclusively with philosophical concepts that are as important today as they were 2,000 years ago. These ideas are based on a broader worldview. Its ideas are woven into a complete system based philosophy that is very different than modern Western medicine. Western doctors use current physiological theories to explain how acupuncture works.

The basis of traditional Chinese scientific thought is grounded on the concepts of Yin and Yang, and the number five. Yin and Yang are opposite aspects of the material world. The number five represents the five elements in the physical world (earth, fire, water, wood and metal). These five elements have also been described as the five transitional stages of all physical materials. Together, these concepts describe the fundamental fluctuating balance of nature - analogous to the modern concept of ecology. The metaphoric principle is that all things must be in a fluctuating balance to maintain harmony with oneself and his universe.

How it Works
Traditional acupuncture involves inserting sterile needles, approximately the width of a human hair, into the surface of the skin where energy is pooled in specific areas. This action creates an ionic transfer that sets into motion an interaction of the body’s own energy restoring symmetry to the body, mind, and spirit. It is a sophisticated yet subtle method of treatment that is effective because it focuses on each patient’s inherent needs.

Anatomy and Physiology
Acupuncture anatomy is a multi-layered, interconnecting network of channels, also called meridians. These channels create an interface between an individual’s internal and external environments. Meridians go directly from the surface-where their energy is pooled at the prescribed site of the acupuncture point-to the depth of the organs. When health is balanced, energy flows freely through the meridians. Principal meridians travel through muscles and provide nourishment to tissues and vitality for physical activity. Additionally, meridians transport nourishment and energy, produced by the organs, throughout the body. Skillful insertion of a needle into a specific point sets this cascade in motion.

Infertility and Scientific Research
In the late 1970s, acupuncture analgesia was linked to the central nervous system activities of endogenous opioid peptides and biogenic amines. Moreover, acupuncture was shown to cause a significant increase in B-endorphin levels during treatment, which last for up to 24 hours (Petti, et al). B-endorphin is present in abundant amounts in peripheral tissues including the hypothalamus and the ovaries. Research that acupuncture reduces infertility showed the central sympathoinhibitory effect that acupuncture has demonstrated to reduce uterine artery impedance and increase blood flow to the uterus.

Uterine Blood Flow
Results of a study conducted in Sweden on infertile women found that electro-acupuncture increased blood flow to uterine arteries (Fertility & Sterility, Vol. 77, No.4, April 2002). The treatment regime for the study consisted of 8 visits (twice a week for 4 weeks) before IVF.

Assisted Reproduction Therapy (ART)
A 2001 German study used acupuncture treatments before and after embryo transfer. The group of women who received acupuncture had a pregnancy rate of 42.5%. While the control group, those who did not have acupuncture, showed a 26.3% pregnancy rate.

Male Factor Infertility
In a study of thirty-five dyspermia infertility cases, conducted by the College of Acupuncture and Moxibustion at the Shanghai University in China, who were treated with electric acupuncture, the sex hormones normalized. Additional affects included improvement in lumbosacral aching, frequent urination emission, prospermia activity, quantity and quality of semen.

Stress
The analgesic affects of acupuncture, and its influence on the central nervous system, have proven that acupuncture treatments help to reduce stress.

Endorsement
In 1996 the World Health Organization (WHO) of the United Nations endorsed acupuncture treatment for a wide range of treatment that included: impotence, infertility, PMS, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), vaginitis, irregular period or cramps, morning sickness.

Conclusion
As recently as December 2002, a study at Weill Medical College of Cornell University on the role of acupuncture in the treatment of infertility supported acupuncture as a conventional treatment for infertility.

Albert Einstein and Traditional Chinese Medicine

By Sheryl Malin, RN, MAcOM, BS, CNOR, LAc

From: Hawaii Wellness Directory. Summer-Fall 2008. P. 26.

"One thing I have learned…: that all our science, measured against reality, is primitive and child-like--and yet it is the most precious thing we have." -Albert Einstein

The correlation of principles between Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western medical science is attracting much attention. Subsequently, scientists have found that the most relevant link between these 2 paradigms is in the field of bioelectromagnetism (BEM), the study of the relationships between electromagnetics and living systems. In 1905 however, a young scientist named Albert Einstein theorized what the Chinese have known for over four millennia. Energy = Matter and by stimulating energy, matter is affected. This principle is the foundation that supports the basic tenets of ancient Chinese doctrine. It is the same belief that Einstein solidified with his equation, E=mc2. Einstein concluded that energy and matter are dual expressions of the same universal substance. In TCM, Qi is the universal substance. Qi is the body’s dynamic force that is the basis for all energy and matter. To conclude, the West is slowly recognizing that it is possible to heal the body with energetic medicine. TCM utilizes skillful manipulation of the body’s energetic design thereby influencing its dynamic cycles. In this way, Acupuncture and Herbal medicine play an important role in sustaining health.

 

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